Friday, December 25, 2020

Poetry Friday: Wish I'd Been There




The theme for December's poetry challenge was "Wish I'd been There or a wistful look back at a historic event."  Hmmmmmm. I'm not much of a wistful person. Nor a history-focused student.  I prefer to think ahead, to what's possible, instead of looking at the past. (Although, I DO love historical drama. Maybe it's the clothes.) 

Anyhow, I was stumped on this one until I stumbled across this article from Mental Floss about the Winter Solstice, and learned that several revolutionary events happened on the "shortest day" in 1620, 1898, and 1968.  Add in the fact that Solstice roughly translates to "sun stands still" and I had myself a poem. 

Be well, all.  You still have time. 


The Sun Stands Still


Sounds lonely,

doesn’t it? 

Sol, hovering

as she did


for Pilgrims,

cloaked and anxious,

setting booted foot upon rock.


Sounds ordinary,

doesn’t it?

Sol, loitering

as she did


for Pierre and Marie Curie,

gaping at radium,

opening the atomic age.

 

Sounds quiet, 

doesn’t it? 

Sol, idling

as she did


for William, Frank, James,

hearts shaking, rumbling

moonward in Apollo 8. 

 

Don’t hold

your breath, then

when Sol suspends

us.  


Be lonely, be ordinary,

be quiet. Sounds poetic,

Doesn’t it?

 

------Sara Lewis Holmes (all rights reserved)



You can find my Poetry Sisters' wistfulness here:


Tanita

Kelly

Liz

Laura

Tricia


Poetry Friday is hosted today by Irene Latham

14 comments:

  1. The turn this poem took was so unexpected and so beautiful, Sara. I loved that it ended with a call to action or rather, inaction. Being. Thank you.

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  2. I love writing (and reading!) wistfulness and longing, so I'm especially enjoying the Poetry Sisters theme today... and the poem's advice to be lonely, ordinary, quiet is beautiful on a Christmas morning. Thank you!

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  3. I love the command of this...making lonely, ordinary and quiet OK. This poem does make me a bit wistful for peace.

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  4. Yes! It really does sound poetic, and beautiful. Thank you for your words! Ruth, thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown.blogspot.com

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  5. After the year we've had, 'lonely, ordinary, and quiet' sounds alright by me. Add to that safe and healthy and we're in for a great new year. Love seeing how each Poetry Sister interpreted the prompt. :)

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  6. Lovely ending. Lovely to think that the ordinary is poetic.

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  7. Ordinary and quiet and still setting the world on its ear, that Sol. I love this. Happy Christmas.❄️

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    Replies
    1. Also, I am amused beyond measure that you, too are a sucker for history clothes!

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    2. Interesting poem! Absolutely love the ending

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  8. What a beautiful invitation to witness all the amazing things happening all around us--the unique and the orginary.

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  9. There's something beautiful and powerful in being "ordinary," and "quiet, thanks."

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  10. Your poem falls nicely into step with the one Linda B. shared (BC:AD). The ordinary and the extraordinary coexist and it's up to us to bear witness.

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  11. You've both captured our year and offered a way to feel good about what's ahead, Sara. This is one I will copy and hang by the calendar, wistful and excited about "new" in 2021. It's lovely.

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  12. What a wonderful using history to shape it, Sara. Be lonely, be ordinary, be quiet is a message that I will cuddle with when writing.

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